Burning Heart

Burning Heart

It’s February!

Hearts and flowers?

Chocolates and wine?

Well, not always.

Undying love – yes – for a good book, well written, thought-provoking, and enthralling.

Many old favorites spring to mind. Books that I read in my youth that profoundly affected the path I took. Books I read as an adult that challenged me to think again about subjects that had become fixed as I got older. Books I revisited with my children and grandchildren. Books I read to a class of children by candlelight.

And now I work in your Library! Making new favorites. Surrounded by books of all shapes and sizes.

Let a great book give you a heart, eager to share your favorite books with others.

Try some favorites of the staff here.

Joseph had a Little Overcoat by Simms Taback, The Lord of the Rings Trilogy by JRR Tolkien, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown, Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin, Grandfather and I by Helen E Buckley, Hatchet by Gary Paulsen, The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper, Animal Farm by George Orwell, The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus, The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict

Or try one of the new books from our booklist below.



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:  (All Hardcovers)

Her Hidden Genius – Marie Benedict
Find Me – Alafair Burke
The Last House on the Street – Diane Chamberlain
The Magnolia Palace – Fiona Davis
Reckless Girls – Rachel Hawkins
City of the Dead – Jonathan Kellerman
Gwendy’s Final Task – Stephen King
Quicksilver – Dean Koontz
Lightning in a Mirror – Jayne Ann Krentz
Steal – James Patterson and Howard Roughan
Abandoned in Death – J.D. Robb
Forgotten in Death – J.D. Robb
End of Days – Brad Taylor

Adult Non-Fiction (Hardcover):

Enough Already:  Learning to Love the Way I Am Today – Valerie Bertinelli
The Black History Book:  Big Ideas, Simply Explained – DK
Patient Zero:  A Curious History of the World’s Worst Diseases – Lydia Kang and Nate Pedersen
The Sleep Fix:  Practical, Proven, and Surprising Solutions for Insomnia, Snoring, Shift Work and More – Diane Macedo
Unthinkable:  Trauma, Truth, and The Trials of American Democracy – Jamie Raskin
The Betrayal of Anne Frank:  A Cold Case Investigation – Rosemary Sullivan
Organizing for the Rest of Us:  100 Realistic Strategies to Keep Any House Under Control – Dana K. White

Adult Non-Fiction (Paperback):

Betty White:  The First 100 Years – Andrew E. Stoner

Juvenile:

Star Wars Character Encyclopedia (Updated and Expanded Edition) – Simon Beecroft, Pablo Hidalgo, Amy Richau, Dan Zehr and Elizabeth Dowsett
1619 Project:  Born on the Water – Nikole Hannah-Jones
The Blue Lady of Coffin Hall (Nancy Drew Diaries) – Carolyn Keene
Sunlight on the Snow Leopard (Magic Tree House) – Mary Pope Osborne

Young Adult:

The Curse Workers – Holly Black
In Every Generation – Kendare Blake
Lore – Alexandra Bracken
Court – Tracy Wolff

Children’s Picture Books: 

Stacey’s Extraordinary Words – Stacey Abrams
The Night the Moon Went Missing – Brendan Kearney
Group Hug – Jean Reidy
Belle’s Playful Puppy (Disney Princess:  Place Pets) (Step Into Reading) – RH Disney
A Book for Escargot – Dashka Slater
Just Help! How to Build a Better World – Sonia Sotomayor
Happy Birthday, Fiona – Zondervan

Children’s Board Books:

The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s First Winter (The World of Eric Carle) – Eric Carle

2022 New Year’s Resolutions

2022 New Year’s Resolutions

A Happy and Healthy New Year to everyone.

When we are at the start of a new year we think of New Year’s resolutions. In the Christian calendar, it’s a little like Lent when we have an opportunity to give up things that are not so good for us.

In Islam, there is advice on changing bad habits for good ones.

In the Sikh religion, Nanak Naam says there are 5 weapons to fight bad habits.

Giving up a bad habit appears to be a problem that we all face at some time in our lives.

If we turn the bad habit into a good habit, we know that it may take quite a while. Research suggests that replacing a bad habit with a good one may take anywhere from 18 to 254 days.

We all know that there are 365 days in the year, plenty of time to establish a good habit!

How about adopting the habit of reading every day?

It doesn’t have to be a great, thick book every day, a few pages will make a great start. If you don’t want to read a story, pick a factual book. You don’t have to read a book from front to back. A travel brochure or a magazine is a fantastic, quick read. As Dr. Seuss said, “Reading can take you places you have never been before.”

If you don’t have anything interesting to read come and visit us. We’ll be more than happy to find something to help you establish a valuable habit for a lifetime of reading.



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:  (All Hardcovers)

Her Hidden Genius – Marie Benedict
Find Me – Alafair Burke
The Last House on the Street – Diane Chamberlain
The Magnolia Palace – Fiona Davis
Reckless Girls – Rachel Hawkins
City of the Dead – Jonathan Kellerman
Gwendy’s Final Task – Stephen King
Quicksilver – Dean Koontz
Lightning in a Mirror – Jayne Ann Krentz
Steal – James Patterson and Howard Roughan
Abandoned in Death – J.D. Robb
Forgotten in Death – J.D. Robb
End of Days – Brad Taylor

Adult Non-Fiction (Hardcover):

Enough Already:  Learning to Love the Way I Am Today – Valerie Bertinelli
The Black History Book:  Big Ideas, Simply Explained – DK
Patient Zero:  A Curious History of the World’s Worst Diseases – Lydia Kang and Nate Pedersen
The Sleep Fix:  Practical, Proven, and Surprising Solutions for Insomnia, Snoring, Shift Work and More – Diane Macedo
Unthinkable:  Trauma, Truth, and The Trials of American Democracy – Jamie Raskin
The Betrayal of Anne Frank:  A Cold Case Investigation – Rosemary Sullivan
Organizing for the Rest of Us:  100 Realistic Strategies to Keep Any House Under Control – Dana K. White

Adult Non-Fiction (Paperback):

Betty White:  The First 100 Years – Andrew E. Stoner

Juvenile:

Star Wars Character Encyclopedia (Updated and Expanded Edition) – Simon Beecroft, Pablo Hidalgo, Amy Richau, Dan Zehr and Elizabeth Dowsett
1619 Project:  Born on the Water – Nikole Hannah-Jones
The Blue Lady of Coffin Hall (Nancy Drew Diaries) – Carolyn Keene
Sunlight on the Snow Leopard (Magic Tree House) – Mary Pope Osborne

Young Adult:

The Curse Workers – Holly Black
In Every Generation – Kendare Blake
Lore – Alexandra Bracken
Court – Tracy Wolff

Children’s Picture Books: 

Stacey’s Extraordinary Words – Stacey Abrams
The Night the Moon Went Missing – Brendan Kearney
Group Hug – Jean Reidy
Belle’s Playful Puppy (Disney Princess:  Place Pets) (Step Into Reading) – RH Disney
A Book for Escargot – Dashka Slater
Just Help! How to Build a Better World – Sonia Sotomayor
Happy Birthday, Fiona – Zondervan

Children’s Board Books:

The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s First Winter (The World of Eric Carle) – Eric Carle

WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAYS

WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAYS

A library visitor asked me if I could write a wish list of the books we need.

Although without books we wouldn’t be a library, my wish list wouldn’t begin with books. That might seem a strange thing for a librarian to say, but guess what would be top of my list?

Yes! YOU!

We love to see you in the library.
We are here to help you to find what you need.
It might be information,
Help with a resume,
Help applying for employment online,Finding a book you might enjoy,
Finding a book from another library, delivered to our library for you,
Hosting activities for adults, teens, tweens or young children.

We are here for you to access:

Free Wi-Fi,
Free use of computers,
Printing for a small fee,
Newspapers and magazines,
Fiction books and non-fiction books,
Books for children, young students, teenagers and adults,
The latest best-sellers,
Homework help online,
E-books,
Free meeting room for non-profit organizations.

Please pop in and visit. You are assured a warm welcome and friendly, helpful staff.

We wish you all a Healthy and Happy Holiday season!



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:

Out of the Rain – V.C. Andrews
Robert B. Parker’s Bye Bye Baby – Ace Atkins
A Man of Honor – Barbara Taylor Bradford
The Sorority Murder – Allison Brennan
Better Off Dead – Lee Child and Andrew Child
The Sentence – Louise Erdrich
Watching Over You – Lori Foster
Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone – Diana Gabaldon
One Step Too Far – Lisa Gardner
The Horsewoman – James Patterson and Mike Lupica
The Paris Detective – James Patterson and Richard DiLallo
Invisible – Danielle Steel
Criminal Mischief – Stuart Woods

Adult Non-Fiction:

All About Me!:  My Remarkable Life in Show Business – Mel Brooks
Immune:  A Journey Into the Mysterious System That Keeps You Alive – Philipp Dettmer
Justice on the Brink – Linda Greenhouse
The 1619 Project:  A New Origin Story  – Nikole Hannah-Jones
The Chief’s Chief – Mark Meadows
Tinderbox:  HBO’s Ruthless Pursuit of New Frontiers – James Andrew Miller
The Defense Lawyer:  The Barry Slotnick Story – James Patterson and Benjamin Wallace

Juvenile:

Beasts and Beauty:  Dangerous Tales – Soman Chainani
The Big, Fun Kids Baking Book (Food Network) – Heart Home Kids
The Big, Fun Kids Cookbook (Food Network) – Heart Home Kids
Donut (The Puppy Place) – Ellen Miles
Stuntboy, in the Meantime – Jason Reynolds

Young Adult:

The Hawthorne Legacy – Jennifer Lynn Barnes
The Inheritance Games – Jennifer Lynn Barnes
City of the Dead – James Patterson and Mindy McGinnis
You’ve Reached Sam – Dustin Thao

Children’s Picture Books: 

A Crocodile in the Family – Kitty Black
Room For Everyone – Naaz Khan
Hamsters Make Terrible Roommates – Cheryl Klein
Dragonboy – Fabio Napoleoni
For Real Life:  A Story Collection (Bluey) – Penguin Group
Uni the Unicorn in the Real World – Paris Rosenthal
Interrupting Chicken:  Cookies for Breakfast – David Ezra Stein
How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodbye? – Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

Introducing the Library’s NEW Makerspace!

Introducing the Library’s NEW Makerspace!

Looking for something interesting to do?

Look no further!

Introducing MAKERSPACE.

A makerspace is just what it says – a space for making things.

Here at the Catasauqua Public Library, we have done just that!

If you like making things, then stop by any time we’re open and have a go at the craft we have set out. Right now, we are painting Diyas. These are small terracotta oil lamps that are used in Diwali celebrations. Diwali is a festival of light in the Hindu religion.

As we move towards December and celebrate the Christmas star and Christian festival of lights, and in January Hannukah and the Jewish festival of lights, we will have other crafts for you to make.

All these are free to all, come on your own or with a friend or group and enjoy!



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:

The Stranger in the Lifeboat – Mitch Albom
Tom Clancy Chain of Command – Marc Cameron
Autopsy – Patricia Cornwell
The Midnight Lock – Jeffery Deaver
The Christmas Promise – Richard Paul Evans
Never – Ken Follett
Forgiving Paris – Karen Kingsbury
Santa Cruise – Fern Michaels
Wish You Were Here – Jodi Picoult
Becoming – Nora Roberts
Flying Angels – Danielle Steel
Oh William! – Elizabeth Strout
Lesser Evil (Star Wars Thrawn Ascendancy Trilogy #3) – Timothy Zahn

Adult Non-Fiction:

Lightning Down: A World War II Story of Survival – Tom Clavin
The Forever Dog: Surprising New Science to Help Your Canine Companion Live Younger, Healthier, and Longer – Rodney Habib and Karen Shaw Becker
The Book of Hope: A Survival Guide for Trying Times – Jane Goodall and Douglas Abrams
Woke Up This Morning: The Definitive Oral History of the Sopranos – Michael Imperioli and Steve Schirripa
The President and the Freedom Fighter: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle To Save America’s Soul – Brian Kilmeade
In Trump Time: My Journal of America’s Plague Year – Peter Navarro
This Must be the Place: Dispatches and Food from the Home Front – Rachael Ray
Voices From the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage and Resilience – Eli Saslow
Will – Will Smith

Juvenile:

Pony – R. J. Palacio
Perspectives (Cat Kid Comic Club Series #2) – Dav Pilkey
Daughter of the Deep – Rick Riordan
I Survived the Galveston Hurricane, 1900 – Lauren Tarshis

Young Adult:

These Violent Delights – Chloe Gong
Our Violent Ends – Chloe Gong
You’ll Be the Death of Me – Karen McManus
Gilded – Marissa Meyer

Children’s Picture Books: 

A Bear to Share – Jessica Alba, Kelly Sawyer Patricof, and Norah Weinstein Aaron Slater, Illustrator – Andrea Beaty
Jan Brett’s The Nutcracker – Jan Brett
The Smart Cookie – Jory John
Is It Hanukkah Yet? (Step Into Reading Level 2) – Nancy Krulik
Grumpy Monkey Oh, No! Christmas – Suzanne Lang
The Christmas Owl: Based on the True Story of a Little Owl Named Rockefeller – Gideon Sterer and Eileen Kalish

New Year’s Resolutions To Live By!

New Year’s Resolutions To Live By!

Many of us make “New Year’s Resolutions” convinced that this is going to be the year we keep those promises.  We are well-intended!  Truth be told, sometimes we don’t even make it to February.  Perhaps the reason for that has something to do with the nature of the resolutions themselves.  What if we were a bit more philosophical about the kinds of promises we are going to try to keep?  For example, although Benjamin Franklin lived a long time ago, and John Burroughs and T.S. Eliot lived not quite so long ago, their resolutions are examples of the kind of thinking that can make a difference.  Truly, their words are words to live by.

Benjamin Franklin, 1706 to 1790, Founding Father of our country, was a writer, printer, political philosopher, politician, Freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, humorist, civic activist, statesman and diplomat.  Franklin became wealthy publishing “Poor Richard’s Almanack” under the pseudonym, “Richard Saunders.”  Franklin’s words to the wise were, “ Be always at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let each new year find you a better man.”

John Burroughs, 1837 to 1921, an American essayist and naturalist lived and wrote in the manner of Henry David Thoreau, studying and celebrating nature. Founded in Burroughs’ memory, The John Burroughs Association is a society that encourages writing in the natural sciences. Said Burroughs, “One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this:  To rise above the little things.”

T.S. Eliot (Thomas Sterns Eliot), 1888 to 1965, British-American 1948 Nobel Prize laureate in Literature and  Harvard University graduate, was a distinguished poet, playwright, literary critic and editor.  Written while he was still an undergraduate, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” is considered by many to be the greatest poem written in English in the 20th century.  Eliot observed that “For last year’s words belong to last year’s language.  And next year’s words await another voice.  And to make an end is to make a beginning.”

Agreeing that each day is a new beginning, let’s do something today to make tomorrow better!



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:

“The Mystery of Mrs. Christie,” Marie Benedict;  “A Simple Murder:  Kate Burkholder Short Story Collection,” Linda Castillo;  “Win,” Harlan Coben;  “Paradise Peak,” Janet Daily;  “The Bounty,” Janet Evanovich and Steve Hamilton;  “Triple Chocolate Cheesecake Murder,” Joanne Fluke;  “No Holding Back,” Lori Foster;  “Missing and Endangered,” J.A. Jance;  “Blink of an Eye,” Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen; “Eternal,” Lisa Scottoline;  “The Affair,” Danielle Steel.

Adult Non-Fiction:

“How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need,” Bill Gates;  “Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain At Any Age,” Sanjay Gupta M.D.; “The Last Queen: Elizabeth II’s Seventy Year Battle to Save the House of Windsor,” Clive Irving;  “Watch to Watch When: 1,000 TV Shows for Every Mood and Moment,” DK Publishing;  “Biden: The Obama Years and the Battle for the Soul of America,” David Lienemann;  “Til Murder Do Us Part,” James Patterson;  “Walk in My Combat Boots:  True Stories from America’s Bravest Warriors,” James Patterson and Chris Mooney;  “Martha Stewart’s Very Good Things: Clever Tips and Genius Ideas for an Easier, More Enjoyable Life,” Martha Stewart;  “Three Wise Men: A Navy SEAL, a Green Beret, and How Their Marine Brother Became a War’s Sole Survivor,” Beau Wise and Tom Sileo.

Juvenile:

Who Is Kamala Harris?” Kirsten Anderson;  “Rowley Jefferson’s Awesome Friendly Spooky Stories,” Jeff Kinney;  “Minecraft: The Shipwreck,” C.B. Lee;  “Mothering Heights (Dog Man Series #10),” Dav Pilkey.

Young Adult:

The Desolations of Devil’s Acre (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children Series #6),” Ransom Riggs.

Children’s Picture Books: 

“Spring Stinks,” Ryan T. Higgins;  “Twinkle’s Fairy Pet Day,” Katharine Holabird;  “Nickelodeon 5-Minute Stories Collection,” Hollis James;  “Champ and Major: First Dogs,” Joy McCullough;  “Dr. Seuss’s Thank You for Being Green:  And Speaking for the Trees,” Dr. Seuss; “Scooper and Dumper,” Lindsay Ward.

Christmas Inspiration by Famous Authors

Christmas Inspiration by Famous Authors

For many years, Charles Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol” has taken center stage.  Literally.   Somewhere there has been a production of Dicken’s timeless and beloved work.  “A Christmas Carol” takes us on a journey from the present to the past to the future and back to the present to find the meaning of life along the way.  It is a tale of transformation. It is probably, after the Bible gospels, the best-known of the Christmas stories.  And it may well remain so.

The Christmas message has been the subject of the work of many authors, some of them literary giants.  Here are a few more books on Christmas themes by authors we all know well. “The Little Match Girl,” by Hans Christian Anderson, is the heart wrenching story of a poverty-stricken little girl who sells matches to sustain her life.  It is a story that elevates tragedy through compassion, faith and salvation.  “Christmas Day in the Morning,” by Pearl S. Buck, is about a boy who cannot afford a gift for his father.  You will be amazed at what he comes up with.  “A Christmas Memory,” by Truman Capote, recounts his challenge to make Christmas fruitcakes for 30 people, having no money to spend and no ingredients on hand.  With a whole lot of love, it’s mission accomplished.  The queen of mystery novels, that would be Agatha Christie, writes about “Hercule Poirot’s Christmas.” You can be sure nothing is as it seems.  A master of fantasy, J.R.R. Tolkien, in “Letters from Father Christmas,” is a collection of Christmas notes that he actually sent to his children.  Those notes embody all of Tolkien’s creative genius, meticulousness and whimsey.  Mark Twain, the great American story teller of everyday life experiences, has set down the stories he read aloud to his 3 year-old daughter, Suzy, in “A Letter From Santa Claus.”

All of these amazing and inspiring stories are found in books that are available through the Lehigh Carbon Library Cooperative, which Catasauqua will access for you.  Since the Christmas season lasts well into January, let us know what you want to read, and we will have it for you in no time!  The Catasauqua Library Trustees and Staff wish all of you a very Happy Holiday Season.  Charles Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol” poignantly concludes with Tiny Tim’s blessing, one that is, perhaps, the most famous of all Christmas messages- “God Bless Us, Every One!”



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:

”Robert B. Parker’s Someone to Watch Over Me,” Ace Atkins;  “Spin,” Patricia Cornwell;  “The Four Winds,” Kristin Hannah;  “The Lost Boys,” Faye Kellerman;  “Serpentine,” Jonathan Kellerman;  “The Vineyard at Painted Moon,” Susan Mallery;  “Bitter Pill,” Fern Michaels;  “The Red Book,” James Patterson and David Ellis;  “The Scorpion’s Tale,” Douglas Preston and Lee Child;  “Faithless in Death,” J.D.Robb.

Adult Non-Fiction:

“Saving Justice: Truth, Transparency and Trust,” James Comey;  “Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America,” Michael Eric Dyson;  “The Killer’s Shadow: The FBI’s Hunt for a White Supremacist Serial Killer,” John Douglas and Mark Olshaker;  “Modern Warriors:  Real Stories from Real Heroes,” Pete Hegseth;  “The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X,” Les Payne and Tamara Payne;  “Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life,” Jordan B. Peterson;  “I Marched with Patton: A Firsthand Account of World War II Alongside One of the U.S. Army’s Greatest Generals,” Frank Sisson with Robert L. Wise;  “The Lost Diary of Anne Frank,” Johnny Teague;  “Nazi Wives- The Women at the Top of Hitler’s Germany,” James Wyllie.

Juvenile:

“Countries of the World: Our World in Pictures,” DK:  “Nancy Drew Diaries:  Danger at the Iron Dragon,” Carolyn Keene.

Children’s Picture Books: 

“Pete the Cat Checks Out the Library,” James Dean;  “Winter Is Here,” Kevin Henkes;  “Albie’s Adventure Through the Alphabet,” Michelle C. Jackson;  “Bedtime for Superheroes,” Katherine Locke;  “The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That: 5-Minute Stories Collection,” Random House;  “Do Not Wish for a Pet Ostrich,” Sarina Siebenaler.

At Thanksgiving:  Gratitude Through the Ages

At Thanksgiving: Gratitude Through the Ages

The holiday feast that we know as Thanksgiving dates back to November, 1621, in Plymouth, Massachusetts, when the newly arrived Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians gathered together for an autumn harvest celebration.  Fast forward to 1939 and President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Congress that finalized the commemoration of Thanksgiving as the fourth Thursday in November. From ancient times to the present, from a Roman statesman to literary giants, to unforgettable world figures, to an American president’s tragic end and, lastly, to a hugely popular contemporary icon and philanthropist, gratitude has been considered an important virtue, if not the most important virtue.  The following individuals take us on a journey through the ages with words that are as significant today as when they were first spoken.

Cicero, 106BC to 43BC Roman Statesman and Author. “A grateful heart is not only the greatest virtue but the parent of all the other virtues.”  

William Shakespeare, 1564 to 1616 English Playwright and Poet. “Small cheer and great welcome make a merry feast.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882 American Philosopher and Poet. “I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends the old and the new.”

  1. Henry, 1862 to 1920 American Author of Short Stories.” “There is one day that is ours. Thanksgiving Day is the one day that is purely American.”   

Elie Wiesel, 1928 to 2016 Romanian-born American writer who survived the Holocaust.  “For me, every hour is grace.  And I feel gratitude in my heart each time I meet someone and look at his or her smile.”

Anne Frank, 1929-1945 German-Dutch Diarist who did not survive the Holocaust.  “No one has ever become poor from giving.”

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 1917 to 1963 35th President of the United States.  “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”

Oprah Winfrey 1954- Contemporary American Icon and Philanthropist. “No gesture is too small when done in gratitude.”

This Thanksgiving, when so many of us will not be gathering together, think of those you love that you wish were with you.  Think good thoughts, then express your good wishes, because those words will surely find their way into hearts.



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:

In the Lion’s Den,” Barbara Taylor Bradford;  “Nothing Good Happens After Midnight: A Suspense Magazine Anthology,” Jeffery Deaver with additional stories by others;  “Before She Disappeared,” Lisa Gardner;  “Dark Tides,” Philippa Gregory;  “The Diplomat’s Wife,” Pam Jenoff;  “All the Colors of Night,” Jayne Ann Krentz;  “Happily This Christmas,” Susan Mallery;  “The Russian,” James Patterson and James O. Born;  “Neighbors,” Danielle Steel;  “Hush-Hush,” Stuart Woods.

Adult Non-Fiction:

“Apollo’s Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live,” Nicholas A. Christakis, MD PhD;  “Cary Grant: A Brilliant Disguise,” Scott Eyman;  “No Time Like The Future:  An Optimist Considers Mortality,” Michael J. Fox;  “The World Almanac and Books of Facts 2021,” Sarah Janssen; “Bag Man: The Wild Crimes, Audacious Cover-up, and Spectacular Downfall of a Brazen Crook in the White House,” Rachel Maddow and Michael Yarvitz;  “The Last Days of John Lennon,” James Patterson;  “Let Us Dream: The Path to a Better Future,” Pope Francis;  “The Best of Me,” David Sedaris.

Juvenile: “Curse of the Mystery Mutt:  A Middle School Story,” James Patterson with Steven Butler.

Young Adult: “The Cousins,” Karen M. McManus;  “The Tower of Nero,” Rick Riordan.

Children’s Picture Books: 

“The Purple Puffy Coat,” Maribeth Boelts;  “The World Needs Who You Were Made To Be,” Joanna Gaines;  “The Trouble with Penguins,” Rebecca Jordan-Glum;  “Rocket Loves Hide-and-Seek!” Tad Hills;  “Natalie Portman’s Fables,” Natalie Portman;  “Kitties on Dinosaurs,” Michael Slack;  “How to Catch a Snowman,” Adam Wallace.

Crafts by Appointment and Lots of New Books!

Crafts by Appointment and Lots of New Books!

Here at the Library, we have missed seeing young children for weekly “Storytime.” In order to observe social distancing, and in order to maintain a safe environment, it has not been possible to gather groups of children together. Fortunately, it is possible for children from the same family to come to the Library’s Children’s Room, one family at a time. Beginning September 15th, “Miss Amy” is available by appointment on Tuesday mornings and Wednesday afternoons for a personal craft activity with children 3-5 years old, one family at a time. All the young children in your family are welcome, but the craft activity is for 3-5 year-olds. Parents can keep their infants and children to age 3 busy with books while “Miss Amy” gives special attention to their older siblings. Please call on Mondays- 610-264-4151- to make an appointment for that week for a very special, personal experience for your young family.

For the past several Summers, over a period of several weeks, the Library has welcomed children for Summer Reading activities. This Summer, as we know, it has not been possible for our children to gather together for group activities. What we have been able to do to celebrate Summer is give our patron families pretty pots of flowers and free books and crafts. These were made available contact-less from our foyer between the entrance to the Library and the inner Library door. And, who can forget the free treats from Oogie’s Ice Cream Truck! All of that was made possible by a generous donation from the Catasauqua Community Partnerships, the same organization that made previous Summer Reading programs possible. In addition to those fun “freebies,” the CCP’s donation has made it possible for the Library to purchase many new books specifically for children and young adults- The Puppy Palace! Dork Diaries! “I Survived!” and more! The Red Queen series! Wings of Fire! The Miss Peregrine series! And those favorites of so many teens- The Darkest Minds series, and The Home Team collection! The Library staff won’t be forgetting any time soon the donation of 70 books from Mackenzie, who had just turned 4. That’s right- 70 children’s books that were Mackenzie’s birthday presents from her friends- Children who came to her Birthday Party knowing they were bringing books to be donated to the Library. Wow! Thank you, Mackenzie! And, please be sure to follow us on Facebook at the Public Library of Catasauqua!



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:
“Anxious People,” Fredrik Backman; “The Sentinel,” Lee Child and Andrew Child; “Christmas Cupcake Murder,” Joanne Fluke; “The Guest List,” Lucy Foley; “Troubled Blood,” Robert Galbraith; “Dreaming Death,” Heather Graham; “Squeeze Me,” Carl Hiaasen; “Chaos,” Iris Johansen; “The Exiles,” Christina Baker Kline; “The Stone Wall,” Beverly Lewis; “The Brightest Star,” Fern Michaels; “Truth and Justice,” Fern Michaels; “Vince Flynn Total Power,” Kyle Mills; “The Coast-to-Coast Murders,” James Patterson and J.D. Barker; “The Midwife Murders,” James Patterson and Richard DiLallo; “All the Devils Are Here,” Louise Penny; “The Book of Two Ways,” Jodi Picoult; “Shadows in Death,” J.D. Robb; “The Return,” Nicholas Sparks; “Star Wars: Thrawn Ascendancy (Book 1: Chaos Rising),” Timothy Zahn

Adult Non-Fiction:
“Fallout: The Hiroshima Cover-up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World,” Lesley M.M. Blume; “Disloyal: A Memoir: The True Story of the Former Personal Attorney to President Donald J. Trump,“ Michael Cohen; “Didn’t See That Coming: Putting Life Back Together When Your World Falls Apart,” Rachel Hollis; “COVID-19: the Pandemic That Never Should Have Happened and How to Stop the Next One,” Deborah Mackenzie; “Murder Thy Neighbor,” James Patterson; “Liberal Privilege: Joe Biden and the Democrats’ Defense of the Indefensible,” Donald Trump, Jr.; “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents (Oprah’s Book Club),” Isabel Wilkerson; “Melania and Me: The Rise and Fall of My Friendship with the First Lady,” Stephanie Winston Wolkoff; “Rage,” Bob Woodward

Children’s Picture Books:
“Clifford Goes to Kindergarten,” Norman Bridwell; “Wild Symphony,” Dan Brown; “Elbow Grease: Fast Friends,” John Cena; “Pete the Cat: Crayons Rock!” Kimberly and James Dean; “5-Minute Under the Sea Stories,” Disney Books; “We Will Rock Our Classmates,” Ryan T. Higgins; “Pinkalicious: 5-Minute Pinkalicious Stories,” Victoria Kann; “Pinkalicious: Schooltastic Storybook Favorites,” Victoria Kann; “Curious George 3-Minute Stories,” H.A. Rey; “Heroes Wear Masks: Elmo’s Super Adventure,” Sesame Workshop; “How To Catch a Yeti,” Adam Wallace and Andy Elkerton.

Fiction vs Non-Fiction

Fiction vs Non-Fiction

When all is said and done, most people prefer to read either fiction, usually a novel, or non-fiction, usually a factual book on just one subject, but sometimes on several related subjects. Happily, for the reader, there are many types of fiction; however, for sheer numbers of types, non-fiction has fiction beat by miles. There are at least a hundred categories of information in any non-fiction classification system. For example, the Dewey Decimal system, used by public libraries, is one system, and the Library of Congress system, used by college and university libraries, is another. Since so many of us have really strong preferences for fiction over non-fiction or, vice versa, non-fiction over fiction, you may well ask, “Why?” So, here goes!

Why read fiction? Most often, fiction, likely a novel, takes us away from our everyday lives. We get lost in someone else’s life, usually a life that seems far more interesting than our own. Characters in novels often have unusual challenges or problems that the reader has never experienced, or actually has experienced, or wishes they had experienced, or never wants to experience! Any one of those scenarios makes for an exciting perspective that keeps the reader guessing, turning page after page. Fiction can take us to places we have only dreamed about. And, often, the reader is so drawn into a character that the line between real and imagined becomes a fine line! This happens all the time with authors who write series with the same main character in each novel. Fiction can also take us into worlds we would like to know more about, like law, medicine, espionage, politics and, of course, relationships! We can learn a lot reading fiction.
Bottom line: Usually fiction is fascinating, as well as entertaining!

Why read non-fiction? Reading non-fiction is a work out for your brain, improving your memory and analytical skills, while helping to keep your brain younger longer. An apple a day, wait, make that a chapter a day, just might keep the doctor away! Non-fiction improves concentration and focus. You need to pay attention to what you are reading, if you are going to understand and remember what you are reading! Clarity of thought in written as well as spoken communication may also improve. That would be because, almost effortlessly, your vocabulary is going to improve. What you learn by reading non-fiction makes you more knowledgeable about something that interests you!
Bottom line: Non-fiction is a gateway to knowledge that does not depend upon having a formal education. You are enjoying reading and learning about a subject just because you want to know about it! It’s a win win!



NEW BOOKS:

Adult Fiction:
The Shadows of Foxworth,” V.C. Andrews; “The Vanishing Half,” Brit Bennett; “Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Evolution,” Brian Freeman; “Deadly Touch,” Heather Graham; “Half Moon Bay,” Jonathan and Jesse Kellerman; “The End of Her,” Shari Lapena; “Robert B. Parker’s Grudge Match,” Mike Lupica; “The Friendship List,” Susan Mallery; “The Midwife Murders,” James Patterson and Richard DiLallo; “Say No More,” Karen Rose; “The Wedding Dress,” Danielle Steel

Adult Non-Fiction:
“Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own,” Eddie S. Claude Jr.;  “Trump and the American Future: Solving the Great Problems of Our Time,” Newt Gingrich;  “The Perfect Father: The True Story of Chris Watts, His All-American Family and a Shocking Murder,” John Glatt;  “Live Free or Die: America (and the World) on the Brink,” Sean Hannity;  “Whatever It Took:  An American Paratrooper’s Extraordinary Memoir of Escape, Survival and Heroism in the Last Days of World War II,” Harry Langrehr and Jim DeFelice; “His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope,” Jon Meacham;  “Chasing the Light: Writing, Directing, and Surviving Platoon, Midnight Express, Scarface, Salvador and the Movie Game,” Oliver Stone;  “The Answer Is…” Alex Trebek;  “More Than Love: An Intimate Portrait of My Mother, Natalie Wood,” Natasha Gregson Wagner

Juvenile:
“I Survived the California Wildfires, 2018,” Lauren Tarshis

Young Adult:
“Hawk,” James Patterson

Children’s Picture Books:
“Clifford Goes to Kindergarten,” Norman Bridwell;  “Wild Symphony,” Dan Brown;  “Elbow Grease: Fast Friends,” John Cena; “Pete the Cat: Crayons Rock!” Kimberly and James Dean;  “5-Minute Under the Sea Stories,” Disney Books;  “We Will Rock Our Classmates,” Ryan T. Higgins;  “Pinkalicious: 5-Minute Pinkalicious Stories,” Victoria Kann;  “Pinkalicious: Schooltastic Storybook Favorites,” Victoria Kann;  “Curious George 3-Minute Stories,” H.A. Rey;  “Heroes Wear Masks: Elmo’s Super Adventure,” Sesame Workshop;  “How To Catch a Yeti,” Adam Wallace and Andy Elkerton

THE BOOK CLUB

The Book Club meets every month on the first Thursday of the month at 6pm. Each month the group discusses that month’s book and decides what to read next. Sometimes members read the same book; sometimes members different books by the same author; and, sometimes members read a book of our choosing in a particular genre, for example, a biography.

KEEP ME IN STITCHES

The Library’s club devoted to, but not limited to, knitting and crocheting meets every week on Monday night from 5:30-7:30PM. At this time, members are finishing up their crocheted scarfs and beginning a knitted scarf. We all help each other. When members feel confident about their knitting and crocheting, we will take on a more ambitious project- perhaps a sweater!